Places of Healing – returning to the Orkney Isles

The Orkney Isles

The Orkney Isles

(http://mappery.com/Orkney-Islands-Map)

As some of you will have gathered from Facebook posts and pictures in June this year, Ian and I returned again recently to what has become one of our favourite places. I’ve been asked by a number of people to re-publish this post, to remind them of Orkney’s beguiling qualities. I’d also like new Followers of the blog to know about Orkney. So – here it is. Enjoy, and let me know what you think. Better still, go there! (No, I don’t have a retainer from the tourist board…)

History

“ Scratch Orkney, and it bleeds archaeology!”

This vivid phrase – from an energetic, silver-haired Orcadian tourist guide on an enchanting early evening visit to the tiny island of Eynhallow off the Orkney mainland many years ago – has always remained in my mind as summing up a defining feature of the Orkney Isles.

This scattering of 67 lush, fertile green islands lying off the north coast of Caithness in Scotland has a remarkable history whose early traces continue to surface. The world-famous Neolithic Ring of Brodgar, an impressive stone circle, dominates a narrow stretch of land between Stenness and Harray lochs, attracting many thousands of tourists every year.

We found on our recent visit that yet another archaeological dig was in progress – very close to the Ring. This time, it is so extensive that it may yield the most significant evidence of ancient occupation since the stone settlement of Scara Brae was uncovered by a severe storm many years ago.

About fifteen years ago, Ian and I took an evening drive down to the Ring. It was a clear night, the full moon reflecting burnished silver off Harray Loch. We were alone. We have often walked around the Ring: it is one of my personal pilgrimages on the many visits Ian and I have made to Orkney over the years. This time it felt different, a little eerie.

Suddenly we became aware of what I can only describe as an electrical charge, running clockwise round the ancient stones. We heard intermittent crackling, saw little flashes of sporadic light. The atmosphere raised the hairs on the back of our necks. Knowing we had had a definite experience, but not one which could be explained logically, we said nothing to anyone. But the sense of ancient power invoked in that experience remains with us.

Ring of Brodgar

Ring of Brodgar

(http://www.orkneyjar.com/history/brodgar/)

Sea

I love the sea, as does Ian. Growing up in the Outer Hebrides meant that water, either pouring from the heavens, lapping gently against the ever-visible shorelines, or battering the landscape in fierce winter storms, dominated my early years. Being by the sea never fails to soothe my spirit, remind me that we are always held in the Eternal, whether aware of it or not. The sea around Orkney entrances me, literally.

On this visit I walked out from Kirkwall harbour on another of my pilgrimages: the morning walk I used to take of about a mile round the line of coast as far as Craigiefield House, wonderful sea views all the way. The low land in Orkney means high, wide skyscapes whose textures, colours and shapes shift and change like a magician’s palette, reflecting always the moods and shifts of the sea. Today it is misty. I sit on a bench and gaze out.

Then, I would reflect on what my day’s writing might bring, as Ian’s busy working day unfolded through many contacts with Orcadians who had grown to trust his professional expertise over many years. Today, we are on holiday here, visiting old friends, familiar places. I just sit, with no plan, letting the sea’s magic enfold me.

Church

In Kirkwall, Orkney’s main town, St Magnus Cathedral – known as the ‘Light in the North’ – was founded in 1137 by the Viking, Earl Rognvald. It is a wonderful building, nowadays owned by the people of Orkney themselves, lovingly and proudly cared for – still very much an active Church. On early visits I used to marvel to myself that such an impressive building was going up here, at the same time as the great cathedral builders of Europe were embarking on a massive series of projects which would take centuries to complete.

Only later did I find out to my surprise and amazement that the European cathedral builders had actually visited these remote, small islands – to advise the Orcadian stonemasons.

On this visit there was a highlight – a new experience. We joined a tour which took us to the upper reaches of the cathedral, via some vertiginously narrow and twisty stairways opening out onto two levels as we gained height, finally gaining access to the very top of the cathedral and fantastic views over town, sea, and much of the Orcadian landscape. I was glad successfully to have challenged my vertigo!

Of many impressive details which the well-informed and enthusiastic guide offered, my personal highlight probably reveals more about me than I should be prepared to admit….on the first level, lying along the floorboards within the stout cathedral walls, was an unusual ladder. This was used at public executions which were very much a feature of  life in mediaeval times and later. It is a double ladder, with thirteen rungs. Two people, the executioner and the condemned person ascended it. Only one came down. Chilling.

St Magnus Cathedral window

St Magnus Cathedral window

(photo: Anne Whitaker)

There is wonderful stained glass from different eras throughout the cathedral. I was fortunate enough to be allowed to take a photograph from on high of my    personal favourite: a glorious jewel-coloured modern window depicting key scenes from the spiritual and temporal life of Orcadians down the ages.

I could have stood on bare boards, high up in St Magnus Cathedral, gazing over the stone parapet at this magnificent window for the rest of the afternoon, had that been possible. However, I have created an acceptable substitute. That glorious window you see here as a photograph is now my computer screen saver: I can admire my version of it, every day!

People

I had two motivations in going to Orkney for one week in February and July each year for nearly two decades. One was to act as a brake on Ian’s tendency to work all day and evening, as he attempted to cram a huge workload into a short visit. In this I was only partially successful….The other was to get away from my own busy people-focused career, giving my reclusive side time to retreat, be by the sea, and allow the writer in me five days of glorious indulgence.

Because of the latter, I was disinclined to be sociable when in Orkney. My ideal lunch was sitting in Trenabie’s cafe (now Bistro!) in Kirkwall, munching one of their excellent toasties with my nose in a book.

However, despite this I still made a few friends, all through Ian. It was heartwarming to receive the welcome we were given on this visit, with Ian being left in no doubt by his former clients and colleagues of the quality of his contribution and how much that had been missed when he left.

One friend we could not have left without seeing is the irrepressible, redoubtable Gifford Leslie, known to all as “Giffie”. Dear Giffie has never quite recovered from having me as one of his guests when we stayed in the characterful Kirkwall Hotel during his tenure as manager there.

Spurning the coffee on offer at breakfast, I would turn up with a tiny jar of my favourite quality instant, and ask for a pot of hot water, much to Giffie’s exasperation and my husband’s embarrassment. Then there was the incident when I managed somehow to splash ink from my fountain pen rather visibly onto the “very expensive!” wallpaper in the Kirkwall Hotel’s Writing Room. Giffie was not pleased, and did not hesitate to tell me so.

On this visit, we found him co-managing the newly refurbished, attractive  West End Hotel with his usual style and panache. Needless to say, I was reminded over a pot of tea (on the house) of my former misdemeanors. Giffie and I concluded as we bade one another a fond farewell, that time had not improved either of us. Ian agreed!

We returned home to our city life, feeling rested and warmed in spirit by our trip, the first for several years. I do hope that this pictorial and verbal tribute conveys at least some of the flavour of the special nature of the Orkney Isles, one of my – and our –  personal healing places. We will be back.

***************

1450 words copyright Anne Whitaker 2014

Licensed under Creative Commons – for conditions see Home Page

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14 responses to “Places of Healing – returning to the Orkney Isles

  1. Sounds like a very relaxing and magical place.I love that your experience of the electricity was one of a clockwise direction. That’s the way Tibetan pilgrims circle a stupa or other religious site. Not by accident, I imagine.

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    • Thanks for dropping by, Ellis. And especially for what you say about the electrical charge at the Ring of Brodgar. I never made that connection until you pointed it out there. Thanks.
      Yes, if you ever get yourself to Scotland, Orkney is a must for a person of your interests. I think it would mean a great deal to you.

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  2. I’m always saying I’ve never seen enough of my own country Anne – this just underlines that xXx

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  3. Just lovely. I felt as though I were right there beside you. I still remember my first trip to England, and my first sight of Norman stones. We talk about history in this country? Pfffft!

    And what a clever idea, to turn your window into a part of your computer. Don’t you wonder what people of that day would think, to find their artistry so transformed?

    I love your words about the sea, too. The sea has so many faces, and what it looks like is determined by the land it encounters — which it, in turn, shapes with its power. I’m so glad you have the chance to go there regularly. There simply are places in the world that hold restorative power. Clearly, this is one.

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  4. Grace Darling

    I am in Australia and have been virtual-travelling to the Orkneys for a few years. The poetry of George Mackay Brown is sublime …. it inspires a lot of the rune-art I crank out.

    And a wordless song moving
    Through the house, upstairs, downstairs,

    At the creeled pier, in the bee-thronged garden.

    She thanked, out of an ancient courtesy,
    All visitors for calling.

    *sigh*

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    • Thanks for visiting here, Grace! Yes, I agree with you about George Mackay Brown. He was able to tune into the ancient magic of the Orkneys, and express it with such power and grace. Have you read his short story collections: ‘A Calendar of Love’ and ‘A Time to Keep’? They are marvellous.

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  5. Grace Darling

    Oddly enough, I have not been drawn to short story collections. I shall note these titles down and keep an eye out for them at the well-loved book stores. Cheers for the recommendation.

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  6. Anne?
    Thank you very much for the lovely story above.
    I have just returned back home from the Hebrides (on Wednesday the 23rd of July), to Norway after visiting teh orkneys and the Outer Hebrides by ship (Lindisfarne, Barra, Scrabster, Harris&Lewis, Lands End and so forth)….AND all of the places at The Orkneys as of you have told about above……One BIG experience all of it. The concert in St.Magnus Cathredal was fantastic (in Kirkwall). And I have bought a big nice painting of the old stone circle out at “the Ring.” Too many tourists out there to really feel “the electrical field”, but the surroundings was Magic anyway. AND beautiful WEATHER all the time(not windy at all).

    Not ONE of the places felt strange, not the peoples, nor the places or areas, the Whole Thing felt very familiar (all of it). I`ll guess it is because the isles and the nature are so much the very same as of the isles upon the west-coast of Norway( the familiarity). The the weather conditions as well because of the Golf Stream.

    Agree with you wholeheartily about the Magic of the Orkneys and the Hebrides.
    Blessings from Inger Lise.
    P.S. Something very funny about the trip was of how very FAMILIAR it all felt!!!

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